the wave trevor sorbie images
Careers

Life Through a Lens: Trevor Sorbie’s Most Iconic Images

by laurahusband / last updated February 22, 2019

Trevor Sorbie images have won HJ’s British Hairdressing Awards, sponsored by Schwarzkopf Professional, an impressive four times. He created the iconic wedge haircut while working with Vidal Sassoon and he was the first hairdresser to receive an MBE from the Queen.

Here are six of Trevor’s all-time favourite images – would you be able to recognise them and would you choose the same ones from his endless repertoire of inspiring collections?

The wedge
“In 1974 whilst I was at Vidal Sassoon, Vidal asked myself and the other directors to do a show in Paris. The now famous wedge was one of my creations for this show!”
trevor sorbie wedge images

The scrunch
“This was created when I was working at John Frieda. I wanted to create a new way of drying hair quickly so took a ball of hair in my hands and dried it with the dryer to create a brand new texture.”

Trevor sorbie the scrunch images

The wolfman
“This look was inspired by punk and went completely against all the rules at the time. Instead of cutting with scissors, I cut with a razor. Instead of drying the hair downwards, I dried it to stand up. I also bleached the ends to enhance a grown-out look.”

trevor sorbie wolfman images

The chop
“Instead of cutting the hair perfectly, I decided to cut the hair into the lengths at random, making me the first hairdresser to create the ‘texturised’ look.”

trevor sorbie the chop images

The red pic
“I created this for the very first show I did in Switzerland. I was told to present six looks, but at the end of the show the models changed into wigs that I’d cut and styled before the show. The 12 looks surprised and impressed the audience so much I got a standing ovation!”

red pic trevor sorbie images

The wave
“I wanted to push the boundaries with this look and combine the old and new. Cutting a blunt bob (which would be today’s modern bob) I created a wave in the front, using an old technique from the 1930s.”

the wave trevor sorbie images

This article was originally published in the February 2019 issue of Hairdressers Journal 

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